Arkansas culture http://visitmyarkansas.com/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 00:36:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://visitmyarkansas.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon.png Arkansas culture http://visitmyarkansas.com/ 32 32 Recreational Marijuana Measures OK for Arkansas Ballot | app https://visitmyarkansas.com/recreational-marijuana-measures-ok-for-arkansas-ballot-app/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 22:52:42 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/recreational-marijuana-measures-ok-for-arkansas-ballot-app/ LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Arkansas Supreme Court said Thursday that voters can decide whether to legalize recreational marijuana, reversing a state panel’s decision to block the November ballot measure. The judges granted a request from Responsible Growth Arkansas, the group behind the proposal, to certify the measure for the November ballot. × This […]]]>

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Arkansas Supreme Court said Thursday that voters can decide whether to legalize recreational marijuana, reversing a state panel’s decision to block the November ballot measure.

The judges granted a request from Responsible Growth Arkansas, the group behind the proposal, to certify the measure for the November ballot.

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Brewery Guide: Drink Your Way Through the Upper Arkansas River Valley https://visitmyarkansas.com/brewery-guide-drink-your-way-through-the-upper-arkansas-river-valley/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 15:36:00 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/brewery-guide-drink-your-way-through-the-upper-arkansas-river-valley/ The Upper Arkansas River Valley is known as an adventurer’s paradise. From summer hiking along several fourteens to world-class rapids, to epic mountain biking and 4×4 trails, the options seem limitless. The fun doesn’t stop in the winter either, with skiing and snowboarding ranging from gravelly backcountry slopes to one of the most underrated ski […]]]>

The Upper Arkansas River Valley is known as an adventurer’s paradise. From summer hiking along several fourteens to world-class rapids, to epic mountain biking and 4×4 trails, the options seem limitless. The fun doesn’t stop in the winter either, with skiing and snowboarding ranging from gravelly backcountry slopes to one of the most underrated ski resorts and still with a small-town vibe. , Monarch Mountain. The beer scene is also surprisingly diverse: rarely will you see so many breweries offering such a wide range of styles and doing such a damn good job of brewing them. Most of these stops will also offer quality food, so don’t sleep on a bite as you sip foam on the terrace in the sun or replenish a winter pint in the comforting warmth of the tavern.

Click to enlarge

Soulcraft Brewing in Salida makes a wide range of delicious beers.

Will Dozier

salida

Located at the base of Tenderfoot Mountain (better known as S Mountain, for the prominent “S” on the face) and next to the Arkansas River, Salida is a mix of welcoming downtown and mountain living. There are plenty of amenities, and the city has done a great job of keeping unique small businesses thriving in and around the city center, with big-box stores located on the outskirts. Salida is also the densest brewing town in the valley. Its four breweries can make for a fun beer spree, and there’s no shortage of dining options either. Any mention of breweries and Salida must include Brewer’s Rendezvous, an annual festival hosted by the Colorado Brewers Guild that usually takes place in July and has become a cult following among brewers and other industry professionals.

Moonlight Pizza and Brewery
242 F Street
Moonlight perhaps embodies the spirit of the mountain town most of all the breweries in the valley. It has a small-batch brewing system producing what usually equates to at least a dozen different beers on tap and pies made on a savory, fluffy homemade crust. The bustling outdoor patio is a great place for people-watching, and this brewery has a certain fun attitude about it — a mountain vibe with a unique personality.

Soulcraft Brewing
248 Rainbow Boulevard West
Soulcraft is an upstart from former Amicas brewer Mike LaCroix. Located on busy Highway 50 along a mix of businesses from restaurants to service-oriented stops to gift shops, the bar is spacious, with a roughly equal outdoor patio to match. There are also on-site and guest food trucks that cater to food needs throughout the week. A recent visit to Soulcraft was a treat for the taste buds, with the Mexican Amber standing out as a clean, balanced beer with a good mouthfeel and a dry finish. The X-Ray IPA was another notable beer; it’s a west coast IPA that’s bitter and dry but with a wide variety of flavors from several new and old hops.

Tres Litros beer company
118 North East Street
Tres Litros is a new addition to the ever-growing Salida beer scene. Located about a football field’s length from the Arkansas River and a few blocks from downtown Salida, the brewery is in a prime location, and the crowds that gather during peak times really reflect that. The beer list is strong across the board, with the IPA game standing out the most.

Amicas Pizza, microbreweries and more
127 F Street
Amicas no longer brews its own beer and has not moved since a short move about five years ago. However, it is a staple in Salida and has been for years, serving great pizza alongside a tap list that includes many local brews as well as house beers made by Soulcraft.

Browns Canyon is quite possibly the smallest brewery in Colorado.

Browns Canyon Brewing Company/Instagram

buena vista

Buena Vista – or BV as many call it – sits just off Highway 285 and, by default, is the closest major town for most visitors entering the valley from the Front Range. While one of the best beer bars you’ll find anywhere, Jailhouse, remains closed, there are more than a handful of fantastic restaurants, a lovely distillery in Deerhammer and plenty of shops to visit in this quaint town . Main Street is quite walkable and there are plenty of outdoor activities nearby. Further up the road, South Main is a newer neighborhood just a few blocks from historic downtown, where new stores, townhouses, restaurants – including Eddyline’s Restaurant – and more line the street .

Browns Canyon Brewery
23850 US Highway 285
Although technically in Buena Vista, this brewery is located off the highway six miles south of downtown, just outside the small town of Nathrop. Located on the grounds of the Rocky Mountain Outdoor Center, Browns Canyon is a place for adventurers to unwind after a day outdoors. The MROC offers guided water, mountain and snow sports tours and safety training while running a free ATV park, named Junk Yard, on site. A food truck led by a chef is also permanently installed on the site. The house beers are made on the road at Poncha Springs in Elevation, and the high quality reflects that. Future plans include an expansion for an on-site small-batch brewing system, among other additions.

Eddyline Brewing Company
102 Linderman Avenue
Opened in 2009, Eddyline has long been a staple in the valley. With a bar and restaurant located within a mile of each other, there’s always plenty of Eddyline to go around BV. The restaurant offers a great choice of dishes, barbecue being a favorite among the locals. Crank Yanker IPA is perhaps its best-known beer, a solid 7% ABV IPA that resonates with drinkers throughout the Valley and along the Front Range.

Click to enlarge

Elevation Beer Company is a must stop in Poncha Springs.

Elevation Beer Company

Springs of Poncha

This small town of just over 1,000 people is located at the intersection of highways 285 and 50. You can drive south to Alamosa or west to Monarch Ski Resort, Gunnison and the -of the. Although sparsely populated, the town has a few good restaurants, a well-stocked grocery and hardware store, and a fantastic brewery.

Elevation Beer Company
115 Pahlone Drive
Elevation Beer Company is a real gem in the valley. With plenty of great beer for everyone, Elevation manages to stand out in an ever-growing field of breweries. From clean, crisp pilsners to specialty barrel-aged farmhouse ales, Elevation offers a wide range of expertly executed beers to choose from at any time. Some of the best bar seating you’ll find anywhere greets you in the cozy dining room, while the expansive beer garden is the place to be when the sun is shining. Elevation is a not-to-be-missed brewery if you’re in the valley, and that’s especially true if you’re passing through, as Poncha Springs is the gateway to destinations further afield like Crested Butte, Gunnison and Montrose.

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MSM prioritize counseling and student mental health – Arkansas Catholic https://visitmyarkansas.com/msm-prioritize-counseling-and-student-mental-health-arkansas-catholic/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 05:14:27 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/msm-prioritize-counseling-and-student-mental-health-arkansas-catholic/ School programs, wellness room and therapy dog ​​contribute to the well-being of the school’s 475 teenagers Posted: September 19, 2022 By Chris PriceArkansas Catholic Staff Chris Price Freshman Annie Burkhead stops by the counselors desk during her lunch break to visit therapy dog ​​Oliver at Mount St. Mary Academy in Little Rock on Aug. 31. […]]]>
Amy Owens (left), Counseling Director, and Eden Coker, Freshman Counselor and Transition Coordinator, spend time with Oliver, the therapy dog, in the Wellness Room at Mount St. Mary Academy in Little Rock on August 31.
Senior Lilli Brooks used her free time during her lunch break to visit therapy dog ​​Oliver at Mount St. Mary Academy's counselors office in Little Rock on August 31.

School programs, wellness room and therapy dog ​​contribute to the well-being of the school’s 475 teenagers

Posted: September 19, 2022

Chris Price

Freshman Annie Burkhead stops by the counselors desk during her lunch break to visit therapy dog ​​Oliver at Mount St. Mary Academy in Little Rock on Aug. 31.

In 10 years at Mount St. Mary Academy in Little Rock, Amy Owens, the school’s council director, said she’s witnessed a culture shift.

Meanwhile, she said the girls’ school has expanded its counseling service not only to help its approximately 475 students succeed in their studies, but also to learn the mental health skills they need to thrive in life. adolescence and later into adulthood.

“We’ve branched out in so many different ways,” said Owens, who was recognized this summer as Central Arkansas School Counselor Association’s Middle School Counselor of the Year. “We provide services for students who have learning differences, so we have a coordinator taking care of that now. We also now have a college counselor and a freshman and transition counselor.

“We are here to listen, to help,” she said. “How can our students be successful if they have a problem that prevents them from concentrating on their tasks at hand? »

“I worked in a public school for a long time before coming here. When I got here I realized it was a special place,” Owens said. “Everyone in this building cares about these children, and they feel safe to be here because of the love and respect they receive. It all lets the girls know that we care. them, which is the basis of everything.

pity, pity me

Mount St. Mary was founded by the Sisters of Mercy, and Owens credits the values ​​of the order as central to the school’s approach.

“I worked in a public school for a long time before coming here. When I came here I realized it was a special place,” she said. “Everyone in this building cares about these children, and they feel safe to be here because of the love and respect they receive. It all lets the girls know that we care. them, which is the basis of everything.

In recent years, Mount has made its counseling program a priority by adding professional positions, study programs and several features, including a designated wellness room, to focus on the mental health of its students.

Eden Coker, first-grade counselor and transition coordinator, said schools in Arkansas have an average of 450 students to one counselor and the recommended counselor-to-student ratio is 250-to-one. Mount’s ratio is around 158 to one.

“That low ratio is a huge advantage,” Coker said, “and it really makes a difference.”

Last year, Mount opened a designated wellness room in the Councillors’ office suite. With a cool color palette, soft dim lights, and an aquarium, the space offers students a calming place where they can temporarily escape to refocus.

“It started because of our connection with other Mercy schools and how they face challenges,” Owens said. “It’s a quiet space to defuse and use coping techniques for something that hasn’t reached a level that requires individual counseling. The nice thing about our particular space is that we can see inside from our offices, so if they have reached a level that requires our attention, we can intervene immediately.

First year focus

Mount St. Mary devotes a great deal of energy to helping its freshmen adjust to high school, and the counseling program has also become a major part of the school’s recruiting efforts.

“On each tour, Annie Cross, our Director of Enrollment Management, focuses on the counsellors, the wellness center and how important girls’ mental health is to us,” Owens said. “She says people leave here feeling good, and they do. That’s their goal in admissions, and that’s our goal while they’re here as students.

“We’re something they want all families to know about,” Coker said. “I think it helps us do what we do because students come here and they know our offices and they know how to reach us because they involve us in the admissions process and in orientation, and that’s a huge help.”

When first-year students arrived on campus, they were paired with upper-class mentors who help them year-round to ease their transition.

“I have daughters watching them,” Coker said. “Our freshmen might be more open to talking to 11th and 12th graders because they are peers. Some of their questions are easy, but if the mentors notice something a little heavier, they can say, “Hey, that girl is having a hard time. Then I can bring her in for a one-on-one meeting.

As part of their spring semester theology classes, each freshman participates in Prepare U, a national curriculum that covers mental and physical growth, personality development, behavior, family systems, bereavement, mental health, social media and technology, relationships and managing anxiety and stress.

“In lessons, they’re given a script, and then in a class discussion, they break down the ways they could have handled it,” Coker said. “They get to talk about the same things they’re going through, but they see it as someone else’s problems. They will often find the right advice in class, which will help them when faced with this problem. There’s a lot of self-reflection and affirmations to be your best.

“It works,” Owens said. “Students do surveys before and after the program and the data we get indicates that it is very beneficial.”

mane attraction

Although not officially on staff, Oliver Owens keeps office hours at the counseling department three days a week. Oliver is Owen’s therapeutic goldendoodle. Between classes or during their lunch break, the girls will stop by the office to give him a little pet, but his presence is for a purpose.

“It’s very calming, and there have been countless animal studies that alleviate anxiety,” Owens said.

According to a 2014 study by University of Pennsylvania psychologists Melissa Hunt and Rachel Chizkov, therapy dogs “can reduce acute distress without compromising emotional processing or therapeutic mechanisms, and may actually improve outcomes at long term for some people.

After the first day of school, Coker interviewed the freshman to ask how his day had been. A young woman said she was really nervous, but “Oliver came up to me in the hallway, leaned against me and told me it would be okay.”

Sometimes his work is more detailed. Owens said a female student was struggling to open up about the issues she was having, so she brought in Oliver to help encourage dialogue.

“She never really opened up before, but she got on the floor to pet Oliver,” she said. “He is so nice and helped her relax. Thirty minutes later, it was completely open. It helps the girls to talk, and it helps us to help them.

Perspective

Kelly Lasseigne, a member of Christ the King Church in Little Rock, has two daughters at Mount, freshman Lauren and senior Peyton, who is on the autism spectrum. Although her mother said Peyton was a high achiever and had always been an A-level student, she sometimes struggled with sensory issues as well as social communication and interactions. She said Mount’s advisers – and Oliver – made all the difference in her daughter’s ability to succeed.

“Peyton just skyrocketed,” Lasseigne said. “The counseling program alone is worth the price of tuition.”

For much of her daughter’s childhood, when Peyton was overwhelmed, she lacked the proper coping mechanisms and went into “a total meltdown,” Lasseigne said. “Now when she starts to feel too fast, she can go to the counselors office, get herself out of the situation and in five minutes she is calm. She could never have done this before.

“As a parent, not having this worry and stress is unbelievable. I can’t even put it into words. I don’t even know how to tell them. I want to cry because I’m so grateful. They have a fantastic program, but when it comes to life, it’s so important, it’s such a blessing.

Senior Olivia Bush said she had a tough end to her junior year, and Owens was able to help her through her struggles.

“Miss Owens was like me,” Bush said. “I could come to her with absolutely anything and I had the comfort of feeling that she wouldn’t tell anyone.”

Now Bush checks with the council suite every day whether she has a problem at hand or not.

‘Miss Owens and Miss Coker are really uplifting and always positive, and you can go to either at any time,’ she said. “They are always welcoming and open, and Oliver is amazing too. It can transform your day at any time. He will just cuddle and comfort you.

“It’s a really amazing thing that they have this here,” she said. “I know a lot of schools don’t have it. If you’re having a bad day or just need a minute, I know a lot of schools don’t have things in place where you can just calm down and reset when you need to.


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Arkansas native seeks chancellorship in Fayetteville https://visitmyarkansas.com/arkansas-native-seeks-chancellorship-in-fayetteville/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 08:53:02 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/arkansas-native-seeks-chancellorship-in-fayetteville/ Daniel A. Reed, one of four finalists for the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville chancellorship, spoke about his roots at a forum on campus Friday. “As a kid from Arkansas, I can’t tell you how excited I am to be home,” Reed said, adding that if he were chosen as the new chancellor, “it would be […]]]>

Daniel A. Reed, one of four finalists for the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville chancellorship, spoke about his roots at a forum on campus Friday.

“As a kid from Arkansas, I can’t tell you how excited I am to be home,” Reed said, adding that if he were chosen as the new chancellor, “it would be the honor of my life, the cornerstone of my professional career.”

Raised in the small rural area of ​​Mammoth Spring, Reed said education “has transformed my life, and that’s what I want for everyone.” Reed is Presidential Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Utah.

A 1974 visit to the UA-Fayetteville campus “changed the course of my life, because I learned to program,” he said.

At universities — especially land-grant universities like UA-Fayetteville — “we help raise students, and I want that for every child in this state,” said Reed, who earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science at the University. University of Missouri Science and Technology and a master’s and doctoral degree. in Computer Science from Purdue University in Indiana. “We hold the hopes of parents and the dreams of students in our hands,” Reed said.

Land-granting universities are “meant to go out and help people,” and that mission has never been more critical, Reed said. “We are not just the University of Arkansas, but the University of Arkansas. Whoever you are and wherever you are, we are committed to you.”

“University is out of reach for many people [due to cost]and it is a moral hazard, [because] education is the only thing I know that lifts people from one socio-economic class to another within a generation,” he said. “When we deprive people of this opportunity, we have failed.

Reed’s visit to campus on Friday included a meeting with students, faculty, staff and university stakeholders, as well as the campus forum, and the same plan is followed for each finalist.

Acting Chancellor Charles F. Robinson held his forum on campus on Monday. Jay T. Akridge, provost and executive vice president of academic affairs at Purdue University, had his Wednesday. Cynthia Y. Young, founding dean of Clemson University College of Science, who would be the first female chancellor of the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, if selected, has her forum on Monday.

More information about each finalist, as well as additional details regarding each nominee’s public forum, can be found on the Chancellor’s Search website at: https://chancellor.uark.edu/chancellor-search/ .

DIVERSITY AND ACCESSIBILITY

According to the University of Arkansas System.

Previously, Reed was the University Chair in Computational Science and Bioinformatics and Professor of Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Medicine at the University of Iowa, where he served as Vice President for Research and Economic Development. .

The For Utah Scholarship “has had a dramatic effect on diversity by opening doors for students who otherwise probably wouldn’t have had a chance,” and it also helped roll out the school’s “near peer counseling” program. university, where recent graduates have gone on to secondary schools. to advise these students on academic matters, he said. The program has been “very successful” and is now used by colleges across the state, he said.

Universities must not only be accessible, but ensure that “everyone is treated fairly and feels welcome, [and that] is an endless journey,” he said. ” To hire [diverse] people and recruiting students is the easy part”, but creating a “welcoming culture so that they want to stay is the hardest part”.

It’s a worthy goal, however, because “we will educate our students better with a diverse faculty, and students will learn more from each other” when there is a diverse student body, Reed said. His grandfather advised him decades ago to meet people different from him because “you’ll get a different perspective.”

GROWING ENROLLMENT

Among those who asked a question during Friday’s Q&A at the Jim & Joyce Faulkner Performing Arts Center was freshman Matt Hughes, who wondered how to balance the growing enrollment of the university – the university set a new record this year – with campus resources and services.

The University of Utah is also setting enrollment records, so Reed saw that “there is always a bottleneck somewhere,” he said. “Growth is important, but you have to do it thoughtfully, without [compromising] quality of experience.”

Hughes, who studies chemistry and is a member of UA’s Honors College, said he thinks the university will have to add staff and services for the growing number of students or restrict enrollment, and he prefers to see the first rather than the second.

“When you wait an hour at the food court for dinner, you see the challenges of increasing registrations,” Hughes said.

If a university intends to increase enrollment, it should plan — and budget — accordingly, Reed said. “You must be prepared to allocate resources for these additional students.”

Reed was the founding director of the Renaissance Computing Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with cross-faculty appointments at Duke and North Carolina State University, and he was also a distinguished professor of the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor for Information Technology at Chapel Hill.

Prior to that, he was head of the computer science department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as well as director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, according to UA-Fayetteville. He also served as vice president of technology policy and extreme computing for Microsoft, where he focused largely on cloud computing technology.

Although reluctant to leave academia, Reed said Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates and then-CEO Steve Ballmer “are pretty persuasive guys.” He also learned in the private sector the value of being the first in innovation, because then “everyone is chasing you, [rather than] you pursue them.”

Students need to see and know that what they’re learning will change their lives, and faculty play a key role, Reed said. All Reed asks of teachers is that they “make a difference in the world.” He also said that “teachers who care about your learning are the ones who make a difference.”

Staff members also need to feel appreciated because “they are the unsung heroes of any university and don’t get the respect they deserve,” he said. In Utah, Reed helped set up on-campus career paths so workers could see the career ladders, and the university increased base pay for those employees.

He’s also concerned about graduate students, because “one thing we don’t do enough is career support for graduate students,” he said. “We have to remember that most people go to the ‘real world’ and don’t stay in academia.”

“LISTEN AND BUILD CONSENSUS”

If selected as chancellor, Reed pledged to “listen and build consensus”.

“Anyone who comes here and says, ‘I know [what to do]”, you should be very suspicious of them,” he said. Reed said he would surround himself with staff willing to tell him “bad news” and when “he screwed up” because “it’s all about humility.”

For Hughes, Reed is the “favourite” of the three chancellor finalists he has seen so far.

Reed “has that real-world experience” in the private sector and a “unique perspective,” Hughes said. “He is great.”

Reed shares a philosophy with Daniel Burnham – the famed architect, urban planner and driving force behind Chicago’s famous 1892-1893 World’s Fair – who urged “not to do small projects”, and Reed said he had no no “small projects”. ” for UA-Fayetteville.

“The assets are all here, and this place is about to explode,” Reed said. “This place is on a roll. What we can design, we can do.”

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Arkansas gubernatorial candidate Sarah Sanders undergoes surgery for thyroid cancer https://visitmyarkansas.com/arkansas-gubernatorial-candidate-sarah-sanders-undergoes-surgery-for-thyroid-cancer/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 23:22:00 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/arkansas-gubernatorial-candidate-sarah-sanders-undergoes-surgery-for-thyroid-cancer/ Sarah Sanders, Republican candidate for governor of Arkansas and former White House press secretary in the Trump administration, said Friday she underwent surgery to remove her thyroid gland after doctors discovered cancer at the beginning of the month. Sanders, 40, said she was cancer-free and would return to the campaign trail. “During a checkup earlier […]]]>

Sarah Sanders, Republican candidate for governor of Arkansas and former White House press secretary in the Trump administration, said Friday she underwent surgery to remove her thyroid gland after doctors discovered cancer at the beginning of the month.

Sanders, 40, said she was cancer-free and would return to the campaign trail.

“During a checkup earlier this month, my doctor ordered a biopsy on a concerning area of ​​my neck and the test revealed I had thyroid cancer,” Sanders said. “Today I had a successful operation to remove my thyroid and surrounding lymph nodes and by the grace of God I am now cancer free.”

Sanders included a statement from his doctor, John R. Sims, who said his cancer was “stage 1 papillary thyroid carcinoma,” which he described as the most common type of thyroid cancer. Sims said Sanders would need “adjuvant radioactive iodine therapy” and called his prognosis excellent.

Sanders, a native of Arkansas and daughter of former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee (right), managed her father’s unsuccessful presidential run in 2016 before joining Donald Trump’s campaign as a senior adviser in communication. She also served as a spokesperson during Trump’s first presidential campaign.

She left the White House as press secretary in June 2019. At the time, Trump urged her to run for governor.

At the White House, she initially worked as first assistant to Sean Spicer, Trump’s first press secretary, until he stepped down in July 2017, when she assumed the role. She was the first working mother and only the third woman to serve as White House press secretary, as reported by The Associated Press.

During his debut, some praised his calm demeanor during daily press briefings – a stark contrast to Spicer. But Sanders quickly clashed with reporters, passionately defending Trump while confronting reporters — even when the information she provided was sometimes false.

One such case earned a note in Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report on Russian election interference. In May 2017, Sanders claimed the White House had heard from “countless members of the FBI” supporting Trump’s decision to fire the FBI director. James B. Comey. She doubled down on her request the next day, insisting emails and text messages of support had flown in.

In Mueller’s report, however, she said under oath that the allegation was a “lapse.”

Announcing his candidacy for governor, Sanders said, “I took on the media, the radical left and their ‘cancel culture’, and I won. As governor, I will be your voice and I will never let them silence you.

She is heavily favored to win in November in the Republican-leaning state against Democrat Chris Jones.

Andrea Salcedo contributed to this report.

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Girl Trek Arkansas to Host Exhibit and Concert at Hempstead Hall September 23-24 – SWARK Today https://visitmyarkansas.com/girl-trek-arkansas-to-host-exhibit-and-concert-at-hempstead-hall-september-23-24-swark-today/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 14:56:32 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/girl-trek-arkansas-to-host-exhibit-and-concert-at-hempstead-hall-september-23-24-swark-today/ PRESS RELEASE The first GirlTrek: Arkansas event is being held to include our urban community and every woman and girl across the state of Arkansas is welcome. This health symposium and outdoor expo wellness walk centered experience is a co-branded, multicultural affair for Arkansas that the entire community can join in on. This Symposium exhibit […]]]>

PRESS RELEASE

The first GirlTrek: Arkansas event is being held to include our urban community and every woman and girl across the state of Arkansas is welcome. This health symposium and outdoor expo wellness walk centered experience is a co-branded, multicultural affair for Arkansas that the entire community can join in on.

This Symposium exhibit scheduled for September 23-24, 2022 at Hempstead Hall UA-Hope Campus (2500 South Main, Hope) featuring a state-of-the-art main theater, breakout rooms, wellness walk, pavilion, Grande opening will take place at 12:00 p.m. With the exhibitors, we will host a Q&A panel with an awards ceremony and evening benefit concert.

GirlTrek is a nationwide movement of 1.8 million black women, now marching towards healing and liberation as a life-saving sisterhood. GirlTrek is a global movement of black women leveraging the historic legacy of walking and the power of self-care as a path to healing and improving our lives. We believe that walking 30 minutes a day is a radical act of self-love and the root of a cultural revolution. #GirlTrek

We at the SouthWest SisSTARs Committee of Hope, Arkansas invite you to be a part of and promote our upcoming GirlTrek National Regional State experience.

This venue will allow all in attendance to hear National GirlTrek Speakers share the 2035 Agenda for Women and Girls, September 23, 2022. Everything is planned with you in mind so that solutions can emerge and we engage in dialogue and to digest and move forward towards accomplishment towards better health outcomes after hearing the strategic goals, mission and GirlTrek vision.

On Saturday, September 24, we’ll ask questions during the roundtable, and we’ll welcome and award “Golden Shoelaces,” for those who complete the 21-day march and read city and state proclamations, before the donation-based matching benefit. evening concert.

We look forward to hearing from distinguished speakers from the community, such as Executive First Lady Barbra Pitts, Orange Baptist, Honorable Mayor Veronica Smith-Creer of El Dorado and Andrea Brown, Mr. Roseanne and Mr. Bandy and A. Lacount to note a few .

We will start the program quickly at noon. We have a roster of dynamic and outstanding hosts who are excited to talk about GirlTrek Arkansas 2022.

The focus on health symposium work rooms will be recorded. Your entry is your consent to be videotaped or photographed. * No balls are permitted in Hempstead Hall.

This event is a treasure trove of information and educational resources for the community and community partners.

Thank you for answering and booking your availability.

The benefit concert, flyer below, will take place at the Hempstead Hall Performance and Event Venue on Saturday, September 24 with artist and speaker Angela L. Bryant.

Thank you in advance, share the news, and we hope you will continue to join us as planned at the end of September 2022.

All are welcome to attend from near and far (this is an in-person event). Please share this information with your circle of influence and peers. I look forward to meeting you all in person for these two daring days.

Spread the word, check out the flyer, please alert others as mentioned. We can promote wellness through walking and increased awareness of outdoor education.

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Arkansas had record tourism in 2021: report https://visitmyarkansas.com/arkansas-had-record-tourism-in-2021-report/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 20:35:53 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/arkansas-had-record-tourism-in-2021-report/ LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KNWA/KFTA) – Data released September 14 by the Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage and Tourism shows that Arkansas’ tourism industry saw a record number of visits in 2021 and grew. recovered after a significant decline in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. According to a press release from Arkansas Tourism, the state […]]]>

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KNWA/KFTA) – Data released September 14 by the Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage and Tourism shows that Arkansas’ tourism industry saw a record number of visits in 2021 and grew. recovered after a significant decline in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to a press release from Arkansas Tourism, the state welcomed more than 41 million visitors in 2021, compared to 29.2 million in 2020 and 36.3 million in 2019.

The statement said accommodation spending rose 49% after a 29% plunge in 2020. The rebound led accommodation spending to rise 5% above its 2019 level.

The data was released at the Arkansas Hospitality Association’s annual convention in Little Rock.

“Arkansas’ nickname, The Natural State, has helped the tourism industry weather the challenges of recent years,” said Stacy Hurst, secretary of the Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage and Tourism. “These numbers show that Arkansas is in the midst of a turning point in public perception regarding our national profile as a tourist destination. Together, we can maintain this strong momentum as we head into 2023 and beyond. -of the. “

Key findings of the report include:

  • Visitor spending, visitor-supported jobs, and business sales generated $1.1 billion in tax revenue that supports local, state, and federal government operations. State and local taxes alone topped $653 million in 2021.
  • Visitation to Arkansas National Parks increased 23% from its pre-pandemic 2019 level to just under four million visits, while hunting and fishing licenses issued to non-nationals -residents more than doubled compared to 2019.
  • In 2021, jobs supported by tourism accounted for 5.6% of all jobs in Arkansas.
  • 23% of tourism jobs in Arkansas were lost in 2020. The recovery in travel in 2021 welcomed a return in tourism jobs, which reached 95% of their 2019 level.
  • Employment recovery in key industries in 2021 reached 98% of pre-pandemic levels in the restaurant industry, 96% in leisure businesses and 89% in accommodation.
  • Every household in Arkansas is expected to be taxed an additional $759 to replace visitor-generated taxes received by Arkansas state and local governments in 2021.
  • Average room rates at hotels across the state increased 13%.

“It’s satisfying to see these numbers and to know that we are meeting our goal of improving our state’s economy,” said Travis Napper, director of Arkansas Tourism. “Not only that, we have the great privilege of sharing the scenic beauty, authentic culture and unique wonder of The Natural State.”

The full report is available here. For more information on the 2021 Arkansas Tourism Economic Impact Report, call 501-324-9611.

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Arkansas Tourism Releases 2021 Economic Impact Report; state is experiencing significant growth | New https://visitmyarkansas.com/arkansas-tourism-releases-2021-economic-impact-report-state-is-experiencing-significant-growth-new/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 14:45:00 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/arkansas-tourism-releases-2021-economic-impact-report-state-is-experiencing-significant-growth-new/ LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The 2021 Economic Impact Report has been released by Arkansas Tourism and there is good news for the natural state. According to data released by the Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage and Tourism, Arkansas’ tourism industry saw a record number of visits in 2021. The report said Arkansas welcomed just over […]]]>

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The 2021 Economic Impact Report has been released by Arkansas Tourism and there is good news for the natural state.

According to data released by the Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage and Tourism, Arkansas’ tourism industry saw a record number of visits in 2021.

The report said Arkansas welcomed just over 41 million visitors in 2021, compared to 29.2 million in 2020 and 36.3 million in 2019.

This means the state has recovered from the significant decline in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The information provided by the report was released at the Arkansas Hospitality Association’s annual convention in Little Rock.

“Arkansas’ nickname, The Natural State, has helped the tourism industry weather the challenges of the past few years,” said Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage and Tourism Secretary Stacy Hurst. . “These numbers illustrate that Arkansas is in the midst of a turning point in public perception regarding our national profile as a tourist destination. Together, we can maintain this strong momentum as we head into 2023 and beyond. -of the.”

Key findings of the report include:

Visitor spending, visitor-funded jobs, and business sales generated $1.1 billion in tax revenue that supports local, state, and federal government operations. State and local taxes alone topped $653 million in 2021.

Visitation to Arkansas National Parks increased 23% from its pre-pandemic 2019 level to just under four million visits, while hunting and fishing licenses issued to non-nationals -residents more than doubled compared to 2019.

In 2021, jobs supported by tourism accounted for 5.6% of all jobs in Arkansas.

Nearly a quarter (23%) of tourism jobs in Arkansas were lost in 2020. The recovery in travel in 2021 welcomed a return in tourism jobs, which reached 95% of their 2019 level.

Employment recovery in key industries in 2021 has been strong, reaching 98% of pre-pandemic levels in the restaurant industry, 96% in leisure businesses and 89% in accommodation.

Every household in Arkansas is expected to be taxed an additional $759 to replace visitor-generated taxes received by Arkansas state and local governments in 2021.

Average room rates at hotels across the state increased 13%.

“It’s satisfying to see these numbers and to know that we are meeting our goal of improving our state’s economy,” Arkansas Tourism Director Travis Napper said. “Not only that, we have the great privilege of sharing the scenic beauty, authentic culture and unique wonder of The Natural State.”

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Symphony of Northwest Arkansas Announces 2022-23 Series ‘SoNA Beyond’ https://visitmyarkansas.com/symphony-of-northwest-arkansas-announces-2022-23-series-sona-beyond/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 18:35:43 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/symphony-of-northwest-arkansas-announces-2022-23-series-sona-beyond/ Photo: Stephen Ironside It’s almost time for another season of Symphony of Northwest Arkansas performances, and in addition to their concert hall shows, SoNA officials have announced plans to continue their series designed to take classical music to more unexpected places. . The series, titled “SoNA Beyond,” will include performances at the Fayetteville Public Library, […]]]>

Photo: Stephen Ironside

It’s almost time for another season of Symphony of Northwest Arkansas performances, and in addition to their concert hall shows, SoNA officials have announced plans to continue their series designed to take classical music to more unexpected places. .

The series, titled “SoNA Beyond,” will include performances at the Fayetteville Public Library, Highlands Oncology, Crystal Bridges, Murphy Park and other area locations.

The idea behind the series is “to include organizational partnerships, special pop-up appearances, innovative art experiences, educational events, and more.” in the area in places, hoping to bring the music to a wider audience in the area.

“It is imperative that we push beyond the traditional limits of what a symphony can do, with the ultimate goal of being a force for good in our community,” said D. Riley Nicholson, Executive Director of SoNA. “As the leader of the NWA Arts Sector, SoNA has a responsibility to break the mold and dismantle perceptions that an orchestra only exists to serve an elite.”

The SoNA Beyond series kicks off this month with Voces Latinas at the Fayetteville Public Library (FPL) at 2 p.m. on September 18. The show, hosted by SoNA musician Raul Munguia, takes listeners “on a musical journey from Mexico through the Andes, highlighting the richness and diversity of classical and traditional repertoire written by Latin American composers. features SoNA musicians Duo Capriccioso, South American artist and composer Amado Espinoza, and others.

A full list of SoNA Beyond performances scheduled for this season is below.

For more information on the series, visit sonamusic.org/sona-beyond.

This year’s main stage shows begin Oct. 29 at the Walton Arts Center. For more information on these, visit sonamusic.org.


“SoNA Beyond” Music Series 2022-23

More events and appearances will be announced as the season progresses. Descriptions below provided by SoNA.

  • An Ongoing Partnership with Highlands Oncology Group: On September 12, 28, October 10 and 25, and other dates to be determined, SoNA will provide a solo violinist for free performances at Highlands Oncology’s Springdale Clinic. SoNA aims to lift the spirits of patients and healthcare workers by offering free shows in the infusion room and lobby. Highlands Oncology has been a longtime corporate partner of SoNA, and now organizations are excited to collaborate more to provide a therapeutic and uplifting experience for cancer patients.
  • On October 1 at 3 p.m. in Murphy Park, SoNA Beyond and the Springdale Public Library celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with a special performance by Duo Capriccioso and salsa band Son Sin Gnero. This event is free and open to the public.
  • On November 6 at 3 p.m. at the Fayetteville Public Library, SoNA Beyond and FPL co-present the classic symphonic children’s fairy tale, Peter & The Wolf / Pedro y el lobo, which introduces listeners to the colorful instruments of the orchestra with a story that highlights vigilance, bravery and ingenuity. It will be a bilingual performance of the classic children’s tale set to the timeless music of Sergei Prokofiev. This show offers young people the opportunity to experience this familiar tale and iconic music with English and Spanish narration. Free and open to the public.
  • On November 12, SoNA Beyond will make a special appearance at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art during the Interform Fashion event celebrating the museum’s “Fashioning America: Grit to Glamour” exhibit. SoNA’s special musical appearance will tie into the themes of Crystal Bridges’ fashion exhibition, exploring American fashion as a powerful emblem of global visual culture, amplified by film, television, red carpets and social media.
  • On November 20, SoNA Beyond presents Latin Traces at 214 CACHE in Springdale. Organized by Fernando Valencia, this concert will explore the cultural elements that shape the “Latin American sound”. The program celebrates Latin music and its distinctive “Latin sound” as a positive and unifying element amidst the clash of cultures during colonization. This concert will feature a world premiere by Carolina Noguera and is supported by the CACHE Creative Exchange Fund. This event is free and open to the public, with donations encouraged.
  • On January 14, 2023, SoNA Beyond will make a special appearance at the Martin Luther King Council of Northwest Arkansas banquet, performing music from Florence Price’s String Quartet. Times and tickets for this TBA event.
  • On March 15, 2023, at 4 p.m., SoNA Beyond is collaborating with the Ra-Ve Cultural Foundation at the Fayetteville Public Library. SoNA, Ra-Ve, and FPL co-present an interactive, educational youth-centered experience – part book reading, part performance, and part demonstration. Featuring a classic Indian story alongside a presentation between symphonic musicians and Ra-Ve crossing the boundaries between Western and Indian musical styles, this event is free and open to the public.
  • On May 7, 2023, at 2 p.m., SoNA Beyond: Transcending Words will feature the SoNA Singers in celebration of Poetry Month at the Fayetteville Public Library. SoNA Singers, a choir of 60 beautiful voices, will sing powerful poems, and spoken word artists will share poems inspired by the music and poetry of the event. Through this program, we celebrate the transcendent ability of the written word, as well as the ability of music to transcend words by providing color, context and emotion. This event is free and open to the public.
  • On June 30, 2023, SoNA continues its partnership with Crystal Bridges to co-present a concert in the Great Hall of the museum. Inspired by the temporary visual art exhibit titled Diego Rivera’s America, SoNA will collaborate with Crystal Bridges curators to explore the themes of the visual exhibit to create a musical program that brings the artwork to life and deepens the cultural links between art forms, identities and geographies. SoNA’s appearance at Crystal Bridges is backed by Greenwood Gearhart Investments. Ticketing details and event time TBA.
  • SoNA Beyond will also present its annual Cooper Chapel concert in the summer of 2023, sponsored by the North Arkansas Symphony Guild and made possible by a donation from the late Elin J. Stene. This event will be free and open to the public; date and time of the TBA event.

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Scouting Walker White, Arkansas’ top QB in over a decade https://visitmyarkansas.com/scouting-walker-white-arkansas-top-qb-in-over-a-decade/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://visitmyarkansas.com/scouting-walker-white-arkansas-top-qb-in-over-a-decade/ photo credit: Nick Wenger Arkansas’ football program has seen a monumental turnaround in recent seasons, going from 2-10 straight seasons in 2018 and 2019 to a 9-4 campaign capped by an Outback Bowl victory last year . A big part of that turnaround was back-to-back star quarterbacks in Feleipe Franks and KJ Jefferson. However, Jefferson […]]]>

photo credit: Nick Wenger

Arkansas’ football program has seen a monumental turnaround in recent seasons, going from 2-10 straight seasons in 2018 and 2019 to a 9-4 campaign capped by an Outback Bowl victory last year .

A big part of that turnaround was back-to-back star quarterbacks in Feleipe Franks and KJ Jefferson. However, Jefferson needs to move on in the next two years and Arkansas will need a new star quarterback.

Malik Hornsby is already on campus and the Razorbacks have four-star Malachi Singleton committed to the current recruiting class, but depending on how long Jefferson has been playing in Fayetteville, the answer could be in the 2024 class.

Little Rock Christian quarterback Walker White is one such potential successor. He’s a four-star prospect, Arkansas’ highest-ranked rookie and the No. 12 quarterback in the nation, according to the 247Sports Composite.

With a composite rating of 0.9321, White is ranked No. 173 overall. That makes him the highest-rated quarterback in the state since Auburn signee Kiehl Frazier (.9725, No. 53) of Shiloh Christian in Springdale.

Despite being just a junior, the talented caller already has scholarship offers from a number of top schools including Arkansas, Florida, LSU, Ole Miss, State of Mississippi, Wisconsin, Pittsburgh, Louisville and others. Arkansas has one thing other schools don’t have, and that’s a history with the White family.

Check out a breakdown of Walker White’s second film from HawgBeat:

Family ties to the Razorbacks

John David White, a former Arkansas wide receiver and Zac White, a former Razorbacks baseball player, are Walker White’s older brothers. He also has a great-grandfather, grandfather, and uncle who played football for the Razorbacks, while his father was a golfer in Arkansas.

Even with the ties in state and family, White isn’t a sure thing for the Razorbacks and is weighing all of his options. There is no shortage of them and the list will probably grow as the season progresses.

“I have ties there, but I also understand the position I’m in,” White said in an interview with Campus 2 Canton. “I understand that many colleges would want me to be their quarterback. I really thought about it. I said this to my family, ‘Look, I’m not just going to go to Arkansas because you all went to Arkansas.’ I’m going to go where I think I can play football. If it ends up being Arkansas, then yeah, let’s go. But if it ends up being any other school, then yeah, let’s go. Because I just want to play football.

“My summary of that answer is no, I’m not just from Arkansas. Getting an offer from there was very cool, but getting an offer from anywhere else is just as cool. Understand that other colleges and d “Other varsity coaches want me, it’s cool. It’s a cool position to be in. I’m completely open to going where it suits me best.”

The recruitment of Walker White

White isn’t lacking in interest, but remains quiet about where he’s going for now. He recently revealed, however, that it won’t be long before we have a better idea of ​​what he’s planning.

“I’ve reduced it a lot right now,” White said after a win at Shiloh earlier this month. “Probably February 2023 – or March. February or March is when I’ll take a look at you.

Also during his chat with Campus 2 Canton, White said he was advised to sign up a little earlier than some so he could entice other players to join. He also revealed that the key elements he looks for in his choice of college are team culture, relationships with the coaches he will be spending most of his time with, and whether that school has any quarterbacks already committed to his school. class.

White has an athletic 6-foot-4, 215-pound frame with room to fill. He’s an accurate passer with quick feet and the speed to break up a long run. He showed all his tools on September 2, when he led Little Rock Christian to a dominating 49-14 victory over Shiloh Christian.

Playing just up the road in Springdale allowed Arkansas head coach Sam Pittman and tight ends coach Dowell Loggains to see White in person.

“It meant a lot because Coach Pittman told me it was the first high school game he attended as a head coach,” White told WholeHogSports. “It was really an honor. It was really cool to hear.

White didn’t let that take away from her performance. He was still locked up and looked focused. He was very good at the start despite the added pressure from the Head Hog in the house.

Walker White reconnaissance report

The result was an impressive performance in which he completed 15 of 25 passes for 181 yards and three touchdowns. He rushed eight times for 71 yards and three more touchdowns, subsequently earning praise from Arkansas coaches.

He started the scoring with a short touchdown run, quickly turning the corner and getting between a pile of defenders. He also showed his moving passes early, throwing a touchdown pass while moving to his right. White used his legs as well as his arm throughout the match as Little Rock Christian ran a lot more bootlegs to the right to get him out of the pocket. He seemed most comfortable on the move.

At the start of the game, his passes were almost perfect. He had a tight spiral and hit his receivers in stride and where only they could catch the ball. Not only could he run through, but he was very stable in the pocket and didn’t rush his throws. His best pass of the game came from the pocket, throwing a penny 15 yards into the left seam.

White showed his raw talent and why he’s a highly sought after rookie, but there were some areas that needed work. Most of the things he needs to work on should be easily fixable with experience and coaching.

He was intercepted in the second quarter because he was looking at his target and didn’t read the security lurking. He also seemed hesitant at times to let it rip, which didn’t lead to any deep realization.

Experience will help in all of these areas – feeling comfortable in the pocket, watching defenders and reading the defense. This assessment must have been picky as White is very talented and he is already good in all aspects, but a little more experience will help him prepare for Division I football and maximize his potential.

The second half was mostly a running game as Little Rock Christian had a big lead and started chewing up the clock. White, however, was not done showing his talent. Late in the third quarter, he showed his speed by breaking up a long touchdown run.

An NFL Comparison

White already has a good game and knows where he wants to go regarding the type of player. He compares himself to – and says he wants to look like – Buffalo Bills quarterback Josh Allen.

“Obviously you look at Aaron Rodgers and Patrick Mahomes, the throws they’re making are crazy,” White said at Campus 2 Canton. “But Josh Allen, he’s a football player. I want to be able to run like him, but if you look, he can also be a pocket player as much as he wants.

“That’s me. I can stay in the pocket. My pocket movement has increased (significantly) and my feel, like in my breakouts. I can do my dropbacks and I can go through my three-step read and do a throw based on leverage, but I can also run the ball in. If the pocket collapses, I can escape and play with my feet.

He needs to fill his frame more to be the next Josh Allen, who is a tough, very strong man at 6-foot-5 and 237 pounds. White might be able to reach that point in a few years — after all, Allen weighed just 215 pounds when he signed with Wyoming out of college.

For now, though, he looks like another quarterback featured in that Campus 2 Canton interview: Kenny Pickett. He was selected in the first round by the Pittsburgh Steelers from the University of Pittsburgh.

“I understand that Kenny Pickett has just been drafted. By the way, he is one hell of a quarterback. He was a dog,” White said on Campus 2 Canton. “They encourage me to get on campus, and I would love to get on campus. I created a good relationship with Coach DiBiaso.

“But they didn’t say things like ‘You could be the next Pickett’, because my game and Pickett’s game are different. I admire Kenny Pickett in the sense that the way he throws is so precise and he knows where to go every time. And he’s a football player, you can look at him, he’s a player. Pittsburgh is a really interesting school. For me, it’s too early to say what my top three or my top five, but Pittsburgh is a school I could potentially see myself going to.

White can see differences in their games, but he and Pickett have a lot of similarities. They both have sleeker builds, have the speed and athleticism to run the ball effectively, and are very accurate passers.

He followed his performance against Shiloh by staying in Northwest Arkansas and making another unofficial visit to Arkansas the next day. Having been to campus a few times before, this gave him the opportunity to meet Pittman and watch the Razorbacks pull off a hard-fought win over Cincinnati.

White’s season-opening performances should definitely put him at the top of the 2024 priority list. Arkansas has a foot in the door with Walker White.

“After a good win on Friday, it was just fun to get up there and hang out with all the coaches,” White told WholeHogSports. “They were really excited. The energy, it was electric. It was just fun to be up there talking with Coach Pittman and seeing all the coaches again and watching the Hogs get a good win.

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More Arkansas recruiting coverage from BoAS…

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