Managing an Unintended Pregnancy in Post-Roe Arkansas: A Help Guide

Anyone going through an unwanted pregnancy does not need any additional obstacles in their path. But attempts to find abortion resources can result in a slew of misinformation and hijacking tactics from anti-abortion organizations — or worse, attempts to harvest the personal data of those requesting an abortion. abortion in order to incriminate them. Here, in alphabetical order, are some resources experts recommend for getting an abortion or finding the right birth control — and taking care of your mental health along the way.

Arkansas Abortion Support Network
abortionsupport.org

Founded in 2016, the Arkansas Abortion Support Network is best known for its abortion clinic escort volunteers, who have protected patients presenting for their abortion procedures from harassment and intimidation by anti-abortion activists. . In the post-Roe world, they act as logistical escorts, helping connect pregnant women with abortion options outside of Arkansas, “regardless of a pregnant person’s economic or social status, or its postal code”.

I need an abortion
ineedana.com

In 2013, disappointed by the fake clinics they found when searching Google for abortion clinics near them, a designer and engineer built this website “to make it as easy as possible for people to find the information and resources that apply to them, without having to sift through much noise or, worse, misinformation and stigma from anti-abortion organizations. Ineedana.com collects three non-identifiable pieces of information (age, zip code and weeks since last period) to connect abortion seekers to localized and verified options.

Diet C
plancpills.org

If you are looking to manage a medical abortion at home, you can find reliable information at plancpills.org. The campaign and information platform was launched by veteran public health advocates, researchers, social justice activists and digital strategists. Their goal is to transform access to abortion by normalizing the self-administered option of abortion pills by mail.

Family Planning Great Plains
planningparenthood.org/planned-parenthood-great-plains

Since 1935, Planned Parenthood has been advocating for sexual health, and they’re still here, providing a wide range of reproductive health services and fighting the good fight in the courts of the nation. Most useful right now might be the organization’s Post-Roe FAQ, which details what Roe’s reversal does for people who can get pregnant and live in Kansas, Arkansas, Missouri or Oklahoma. You can find it at plannedparenthood.org/planned-parenthood-great-plains/post-roe-faq.

Reproduction
reproduction.org

This self-proclaimed “left flank culture change organization” does tons of advocacy and community organizing, but is also a helpful resource on AMS (self-directed abortion) – abortions that occur outside of the care of a provider, often with a pill called misoprostol. Go to reproaction.org/campaign/self-managed-abortion for detailed myths about the differences between Plan B, misoprostol and mifepristone.

therapy for black girls
therapyforblackgirls.com

Not everyone who has an abortion will need to speak with a therapist, but some will, and we know that the people most likely to bear the greatest burden of abortion access restrictions are black women. Founded by psychologist Dr. Joy Harden Bradford, this website helps connect Black women with mental wellness resources online and with local therapists.

women help women
abortionpillinfo.org

Under the mantra of “connecting the personal experience of swallowing a pill to global political activism”, the SASS branch of this organization (self-directed abortion; safe and supported) exists to “support people in the United States who choose to have an abortion with pills outside the healthcare system. The goal of SASS is to ensure that people in the United States can obtain accurate, up-to-date information on how to self-manage an abortion with pills safely, with dignity, and with minimal legal risk.

women on the web
womenonweb.org

Based in Canada and founded in 2005, this international telemedicine service connects people (including “trans, non-binary, genderqueer and gender non-conforming people”, although their name does not reflect this) with doctors, researchers, activists and a help desk. members. You can schedule a consultation online and, after review by a doctor, get access to medicated abortion pills or birth control by mail. There’s also a helpful abortion pills FAQ and a place to share your own abortion story if you’re ready.

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